Home » Stolen Works of Art: Art Theft, Ghent Altarpiece, International Art Crime Studies Masters Program, Portrait of Suzanne Bloch by Books LLC
Stolen Works of Art: Art Theft, Ghent Altarpiece, International Art Crime Studies Masters Program, Portrait of Suzanne Bloch Books LLC

Stolen Works of Art: Art Theft, Ghent Altarpiece, International Art Crime Studies Masters Program, Portrait of Suzanne Bloch

Books LLC

Published May 7th 2010
ISBN : 9781155821801
Paperback
76 pages
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 About the Book 

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Art Theft, Ghent Altarpiece, International Art Crime StudiesMorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Art Theft, Ghent Altarpiece, International Art Crime Studies Masters Program, Portrait of Suzanne Bloch, Frankfurt Art Theft, Foundation E.g. Bhrle, Theft of Medieval Art From Quedlinburg, Madonna of the Yarnwinder, Burnside Fountain, the Storm on the Sea of Galilee, the Just Judges, Russian Schoolroom, the Boy in the Red Vest, Count Lepic and His Daughters, the Concert, Jacqueline, Nude. Excerpt: Art theft is the theft of art . This is usually done for the purpose of resale or ransom- occasionally thieves are also commissioned by dedicated private collectors. Stolen art is sometimes used by criminals to secure loans. Individual theft Many thieves are motivated by the fact that reasonably valuable art pieces are worth millions of dollars and weigh only a few kilograms, at most. Transport for items such as paintings is also trivial, assuming the thief is willing to inflict some damage to the painting by cutting it off the frame and rolling it up into a tube carrier. While most high-profile museums have extremely tight security, many places hosting multimillion dollar works have disproportionately poor security measures. That makes them susceptible to thefts that are slightly more complicated than a typical smash-and-grab, but with huge payoff. However, because the ownership of high profile art is easily tracked, potential buyers are very hard to find. Typically, a thief will steal a work, only to find out that there are no buyers. For the same reason, the stolen piece cannot be displayed publicly, which essentially defeats the purpose of having it. Unfortunately, while no thief can hope to get the actual value of the stolen work, even as little as 5 % of the real value can be worthwhile for the thief. Most art is resold at auction houses- major reputable houses such as Sotheb...