Home » A Viper in the Bosom: A Collection of Parricides by Nicola Sly
A Viper in the Bosom: A Collection of Parricides Nicola Sly

A Viper in the Bosom: A Collection of Parricides

Nicola Sly

Published
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
280 pages
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 About the Book 

There can’t be many people who have never felt peeved with either one or both of their parents but thankfully, very few go to the extreme of murdering them, as did all of the men and women featured in this countrywide collection of true tales ofMoreThere can’t be many people who have never felt peeved with either one or both of their parents but thankfully, very few go to the extreme of murdering them, as did all of the men and women featured in this countrywide collection of true tales of historical parricide. Some killed in a moment of rage, while others meticulously planned to kill. Some of the murderers were drunk at the time, some were later judged to be insane. Their motives and means differed wildly but the one thing that they all had in common was the pressing need to rid themselves of a seemingly irksome parent or parents.Mary Blandy (1751) and Mary Gallop (1844) killed because their fathers disapproved of the men they loved, while Jane Scott (1827) killed both of her parents in the hope of receiving an inheritance, which would allow her to marry the man of her choice. Catherine Mercy Newton (1848) was also alleged to have killed her mother for her inheritance but, after no less than three trials, she was eventually found not guilty.John Ward (1849) shot his mother after she reprimanded him for raping a servant and Thomas Harvey (1861) beat his mother to death with a hammer to end a long-standing argument about the ownership of a piece of land. Alfred William George Dixon cut his drunken mother’s throat in 1890, while Edwin James Moore (1907) was drunk when he set his mother on fire after she burned his fish supper. George Edward Hobbs (1901) and Frederick Wyndham (1893) both shot their fathers, Hobbs after a dispute about who was ‘boss of the house’ and Wyndham because he disapproved of the ‘whore’ with whom his father was living.In 1910, John White was said to be the first person convicted of frightening someone to death, whereas George William Cooper (1923) and Eric James Brown (1943) both killed their fathers because they felt that their mothers were being abused, Brown by the unusual method of placing a bomb beneath his father’s wheelchair.Some of the parricides worked with siblings to kill, although the weight of justice often fell more heavily on one sibling than the other. Dick and George Davies (1890) despatched their father in a simulated highway robbery, Faith and Mary Ann Sealey (1843) believed that they would be better off without their father and Robert and Nathaniel Coombes were only thirteen and twelve years old when they were accused of stabbing their mother through the heart in 1895.These and the many others included in this collection show the perils of nurturing a viper in the bosom - one day, you might not live to regret it.